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Saturday, February 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Nicomachean Ethics, by Aristotle found in the catalog.

The Nicomachean Ethics, by Aristotle

Hippocrates George Apostle

The Nicomachean Ethics, by Aristotle

Translation with Commentaries and Glossary (Synthese Historical Library)

by Hippocrates George Apostle

  • 39 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Springer .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ancient Greek & Roman philosophy,
  • History & Surveys - General,
  • Philosophy / History, Criticism, Surveys,
  • Philosophy

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages394
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12801761M
    ISBN 10902771150X
    ISBN 109789027711502
    OCLC/WorldCa16541156

    Even if there were a single unifying Form of Good, our interest is in the practical question of how to be good, so we should concern ourselves not with this abstract concept but with the practical ends we can actually pursue in everyday life. It seems different in different actions and arts; it is different in medicine, in strategy, and in the other arts likewise. An excellent human will be a person good at living life, who does it well and beautifully kalos. Thus the function of man is activity of the soul according to reason. As an example of this we have the lawgivers of the Cretans and the Spartans, and any others of the kind that there may have been.

    Temperance keeps the desiring part of the soul in harmony with reason. Note that ignorance of what aims are good and bad, such as people of bad character always have, is not something people typically excuse as ignorance in this sense. The virtuous person alone can attain happiness and the virtuous person can never be miserable in the deepest sense, even in the face of misfortune which keeps him from being happy or blessed. Life seems to be common even to plants, but we are seeking what is peculiar to man. Now if the function of man is an activity of soul which follows or implies a rational principle, and if we say 'so-and-so-and 'a good so-and-so' have a function which is the same in kind, e. For this one requires sufficient external goods to ensure health, leisure, and the opportunity for virtuous action.

    But what then do we mean by the good? Section 3: Some think that happiness is to be found in pleasure, others that it is to be found in honor, and others that it is to be found in contemplation. For we praise the rational principle of the continent man and of the incontinent, and the part of their soul that has such a principle, since it urges them aright and towards the best objects; but there is found in them also another element naturally opposed to the rational principle, which fights against and resists that principle. Aristotle accepted that it would be wrong to call Priam unhappy only because his last years were unhappy.


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The Nicomachean Ethics, by Aristotle book

Consequently, we can aim at only a rough outline of the Good. Now some of these views have been held by many men and men of old, others by a few eminent persons; and it is not probable that either of these should be entirely mistaken, but rather that they should be right in at least some one by Aristotle book or even in most respects.

Now if there is any gift of the gods to men, it is reasonable that happiness should be god-given, and most surely god-given of all human things inasmuch as it is the best.

For this reason also a boy is not happy; for he is not yet capable of such acts, owing to his age; and boys who are called happy are being congratulated by reason of the hopes we have for them. Have the carpenter, then, and the tanner certain functions or activities, and has man none?

On his view, the virtuous person takes delight in what is fine and noble and is pained at what is shameful.

As Sachs points out,p. But enough of this; for the subject has been sufficiently treated even in the current discussions. But he says that it seems that if anything at all gets through to the deceased, whether good or the reverse, it would be something faint and small.

Now if we must see the end and only then call a man happy, not as being happy but as having been so before, surely this is a paradox, that when he is happy the attribute that belongs to him is not to be truly predicated of him because we do not wish to call living men happy, on account of the changes that may befall them, and because we have assumed happiness to be something permanent and by no means easily changed, while a single man may suffer many turns of fortune's wheel.

Virtue is difficult to attain, since if we simply follow our inclinations, we become vicious. However, true happiness must be independent, it must depend upon yourself. Ethics and politics are closely related, for politics is the science of creating a society in which men can live the good life and develop their full potential.

If so, we shall call happy those among living men in whom these conditions are, and are to be, fulfilled- but happy men.

Not only will human happiness involve reason, but it will also be an active being-at-work energeianot just potential happiness. By human virtue we mean not that of the body but that of the soul; and happiness also we call an activity of soul. Virtue too is distinguished into kinds in accordance with this difference; for we say that some of the virtues are intellectual and others moral, philosophic wisdom and understanding and practical wisdom being intellectual, liberality and temperance moral.

First of all, he insists on seeking precision in an inquiry only within the limits set by the nature of the inquiry itself. What distinguishes choice is that before a choice is made there is a rational deliberation or thinking things through.

The deficiency of this virtue is called meanness and the excess is ostentation. Section 8: There are three types of goods: external, those of the soul and those of the body. Friendship presupposes justice and goes beyond it. And if this element also must be said to have a rational principle, that which has a rational principle as well as that which has not will be twofold, one subdivision having it in the strict sense and in itself, and the other having a tendency to obey as one does one's father.

But if we do not call the dead man happy, and if Solon does not mean this, but that one can then safely call a man blessed as being at last beyond evils and misfortunes, this also affords matter for discussion; for both evil and good are thought to exist for a dead man, as much as for one who is alive but not aware of them; e.

And so too with good things; no one praises happiness as he does justice, but rather calls it blessed, as being something more divine and better.

Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (Summary)

For Plato, too, was right in raising this question and asking, as he used to do, 'are we on the way from or to the first principles? And this will be found to agree with what we said at the outset; for we stated the end of political science to be the best end, and political science spends most of its pains on making the citizens to be of a certain character, viz.

And so the man who has been educated in a subject is a good judge of that subject, and the man who has received an all-round education is a good judge in general. As discussed earlier, vice comes from bad habits and aiming at the wrong things, not deliberately aiming to be unhappy. First, he notes that flourishing for plants and animals consists in their functioning well according to their natures.

Among its The Nicomachean Ethics outstanding features are Aristotle's insistence that there are no known absolute moral standards and that any ethical theory must be based in part on an understanding of psychology and firmly grounded in the realities of human nature and daily life.

The next virtue is temperance. Lawmakers also work in this way, trying to encourage and discourage the right voluntary actions, but don't concern themselves with involuntary actions.Feb 08,  · ARISTOTLE: The Nicomachean Ethics - FULL AudioBook | Greatest Audio Books The work consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and.

Apr 23,  · The Nicomachean Ethics is one of Aristotle’s most widely read and influential works. Ideas central to ethics—that happiness is the end of human endeavor, that moral virtue is formed through action and habituation, and that good action requires prudence—found their most powerful proponent in the person medieval scholars simply called “the Philosopher.”/5.

Book 1, Chapter 6. Before proceeding, though, Aristotle points out that it’s best to figure out what is meant by the atlasbowling.come it is spoken of in so many different ways, we can conclude that there isn’t a single, universal good.

Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics study guide contains a biography of Aristotle, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Nicomachean Ethics (The New Hackett Aristotle) Paperback. Aristotle. out of 5 stars 9. $ Editorial Reviews Review a useful, readable text with no improvising for the sake of distinction at the cost of authenticity and clarity.

The end notes and glossary are very helpfulDr. Howard Ruttenberg, York College, CUNY/5(). The Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle The Nicomachean Ethics is the name normally given to Aristotle's best-known work on ethics. The work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum/5.